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CHD Public Health

Telephone - 541-962-8800
info@chdinc.org

State of Oregon Flu Hotline
1-800-978-304

The FLU Ends with U. Moms make a difference. Learn more: www.flu.gov

2013-2014 Flu Season & Clinics

Flu Clinics
W
e provide flu clinics throughout the Union County area to make it easy for you and your family to get your flu shot.  At each clinic you are welcome to stop by anytime that is convenient.  Please bring your insurance card or if you prefer to pay by cash we can accept that as well.  Public Health provides a walk-in clinic on Friday from 8:30 am until 4:30 pm where flu shots are available, no appointment is necessary, although we recommend appointments for groups and families of 3 or more.  If you can't make one of the clinics call 541-962-8800 to schedule an appointment. 

Would you like a flu clinic scheduled at your place of business?  For more information call us at 541-962-8800 or email info@chdinc.org with any questions.  We will keep our event calendar updated with the latest flu shot clinics dates and times.

Flu Season Update 1/3/14 - From Oregon Public Health
Influenza is caused by a virus spread person-to-person, through the air and on hard surfaces in droplets from sneezes and coughs. Illness from the flu can last for 10 days or more. Symptoms include sore throat, coughing, runny nose, congestion, fever, muscle aches and headache. For some people, the flu can be a very serious, even deadly disease, which could lead to secondary infections such as pneumonia. In Oregon, the influenza season is quickly ramping up and most cases are H1N1. Every flu season is different, and influenza can affect people differently. Even healthy children and adults can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others.

 

  1. Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent flu infection, and the best way to protect yourself and your community from illness. The CDC recommends everyone aged 6 months and older should receive an annual influenza vaccination. Children 6 months through 8 years may need two doses depending on previous flu vaccine history, so it is important to talk to your child's healthcare provider. A seasonal flu vaccination is especially important for people with chronic medical conditions, pregnant women, for healthcare workers, and for people living with or caring for babies six months and younger, or others who are unable to be vaccinated because of health reasons. The vaccine is available, but people may need to call their provider or pharmacies to locate vaccine near them.
     
  1. Each year, scientists determine which flu strains are likely to cause the most disease in the coming flu season and include them in the flu vaccine. The 2013-14 trivalent seasonal flu shot protects against: H1N1, H3N2 and influenza B/ Massachusetts. A new quadrivalent vaccine includes those three strains as well as B/Brisbane. People who had a flu vaccination last year should also get vaccinated this year, since the flu strains that are circulating change over time. Flu vaccine is manufactured under strict federal standards and thoroughly tested before it is offered to the public. There is an intradermal influenza vaccine for people ages 18-64 that is injected into the skin instead of the muscle. It uses a much smaller needle than the regular flu shot. There is also a trivalent vaccine that is egg-free for people who suffer from egg allergies.
     
  1. In addition to vaccination, these preventive measures can help stop flu and other diseases from circulating:
    1. Cover your cough and sneeze
    2. Wash your hands often.  Use soap and warm water.
    3. Stay home when you’re sick.  Protect others at school and work by staying home at least 24-hours after your fever (100+ degrees) subsides (subsides without fever reducing medicines).
    4. Take antiviral medications if prescribed.
    5. Clean surfaces.  Flu germs can live for hours on hard surfaces.  Make sure your home and workspace are wiped down frequently, especially where children are playing.
       

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Flu Near You - Do you have it in you?


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In order to receive government funding, the Center for Human Development, Inc. (CHD) is required by state and county policies  to charge for services it provides to the public.  However no one will be denied clinical services because of an inability to pay.  CHD does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, national origin, family status, age or disability.  For further information on this policy contact Human Relations, 541-962-8811 or TTY 1-800-735-2900 or 711.

The Center for Human Development, Inc. is a Tobacco-Free Zone.  Oregon law prohibits the use of all tobacco products in CHD buildings and on CHD property. 
OAR 515.051.0065